Unconventional advice about getting started on Twitter

Getting started on Twitter is like pushing a boulder up a mountain in a snowstorm while wearing flip-flops.

10 unconventional ideas about building an audience.

  1. Followers aren’t the goal. The goal is to create something worth following. Followers are a lagging indicator of great work.
  2. The secret to success isn’t mentors, it’s peers. Surround yourself with people on your level doing great things.
  3. Don’t be a chameleon. Be a bird of paradise. Flaunt what makes you different.
  4. Writing on Twitter like surfing Nazare. Catch a 78-foot wave, take it on a magical ride.
  5. Build bricks, not castles. …


Unconventional advice about life and creations

For your first project, don’t build a castle. Build bricks.

Unconventional advice about online creations.

If you’re getting started creating online, don’t build a castle. You’re better off building bricks. Bricks are solid, timeless, and consistent.

Bricks are like LEGOs. Build bricks today, assemble tomorrow. Initial bricks are poor. Consistency comes with practice.

Good bricks require reps. Some people say 10,000 hours to hone your craft. Bricks apply to anything. Blogs, videos, illustrations… the list goes on.

After mastering bricks, it’s time to assemble. Start with something small. Tweets become threads and blogs become courses. …


Pressing publish on your first piece might feel like dropping in on a 78-foot wave. Don’t freak, send it.


A series of short stories

Photo by Rajvinder Singh on Unsplash

Summertime, my favorite season. Bleached blonde hair, and white sand beaches. Take a break, one week or two. Return refreshed, and mind-renewed.


A series of short stories

Photo by Elias Maurer

Playground

The edge of the world is mother nature’s playground. Day by day, she graces us with an innocuous presence, searching for the right combination of elements. One afternoon, she flips the script. In an instant, life turns upside down.


A series of short stories

Photo by Afrah

Surfer

Every day, a surfer paddles out to sea, in search of “the one,” that perfect wave. Day in, and day out; day in, and day out; a melody of surf and sea. Until one day, she catches a flawless barrel and takes it on an unforgettable ride.


How one innovator gives outdoor apparel new meaning

Yvon Chouinard got his start in 1953 as a 14-year-old climber at the Southern California Falconry Club. He studied climbing under one of the adult leaders, Don Prentice, learning to rappel down the cliffs to explore the falcon nests. Those lessons stuck with Yvon and sparked his lifelong love of climbing.

Shortly thereafter, Chouinard began hanging out at Stoney Point and Tahquitz Rock, where he met some other young climbers who belonged to the Sierra Club. Eventually, the friends moved on from Tahquitz to Yosemite, to teach themselves to climb its big walls.

Back then, climbers only had access to…


Hawaiians Traditions Hold Secrets To Planet Protection.

Photo by Drew Farwell on Unsplash | Hana, Maui, HI

I grew up in a family that valued travel and had the means to afford a big trip every year. One year, we escaped to the beautiful island of Maui. What I discovered in Hawaii wasn’t just white sand beaches and stunning scenery, but a completely different culture and a different way of thinking.

The aloha spirit makes Hawaii a one of a kind place.

Over time, I discovered many Hawaiian traditions. We’re all familiar with hula, but there were other ideas that stuck with me still to this day. One of those ideas is called Malama and it means…


How one Colorado-based brewery is crafting beer for a brighter future.

Photo by Joshua Forbes on Unsplash | The Crags Trail, Colorado

If you speak with people in the beer industry about sustainable practices, one thing quickly becomes clear: brewing, in general, is not an environmentally friendly business.

“Beer is about as wasteful a product you can imagine,” says Joe Bolick, a director at the Iowa Waste Reduction Center, a non-profit organization that provides environmental consulting for state businesses.

Unfortunately, it’s true. Breweries require significant energy to kiln-dry and roast malt, heat mash, boil hops, chill, and refrigerate the final product. On top of the brewing process, there are byproducts and transportation.

Sustainability has been a focal point in the wine industry…

Jamie Russo

Unconventional wisdom for aspiring creatives. Subscribe: goodnote.substack.com.

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